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Full text of "Nova (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy)"

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ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r^lIVlSA ^ Pioneering Editcalumal Caninuinity 



Volume 7 No. I •Fall 1992 



Renowned Nuclear Physicist Gives Series of Lectures at IMSA 

Dr. Edward Teller Shares His Views 
on Science, Politics and History 

I — or two weeks in No\ember, IMSA Lecture, entitled 

L~ students, faculty and staff, and -Science From a Political 

in\ ited guests came face to face with a and Historical Point of 

niaior figure in world history. View." Teller lauded the 

Dr. Edward Teller, one of the most eel- .Academy for its role in 

ebrated physicists of this century . \ isited improving mathematics, 

the campus October 28-November 1 2 to science and technology 

present a series of lectures, including the educatitm in Illinois, 

second annual James R. Thompson "What you are tr\ ing to 

Leadership Lecture. do at the Academy is 

Teller, director emeritus of Lawrence incredibly important." he 

Livermore National Laboratory and said. "We need young 

senior research fellow at the Hoover people who recognize 

Institution, has received worldwide that technology is the 

acclaim for his research in chemical. human future, who 

molecular and nuclear physics; quantum understand that technolo- 

mechanics: and thermonuclear reactions. g\ is an absolutely neees- 

The 84-year-old physicist is perhaps sary component." 
best known for his work w ith the He also argued that 

Manhattan Project at Los Alamos research should contmue 

Scientific Laboratory. His research on to play an important part 
releasing energy through nuclear fusion in policy making. "I 

e\ entually led to the first test of the belie\ e that know ledge 

hsdrogen bomb in 1932. and technology are 

During the Thompson Leadership always desirable." Teller 

said. "To stop research is 

not right." 

Teller, whose views 

have sparked consider- 

Admissions Information 3 ,„,^„,u,„i 

able debate among leau- 

Hurricane Benefit Concerts 4 ers in the political and sci- />'. tulunrJ Tdlci 

entific arenas, met w ith 
IMSA Math Journal 6 ,^^^^,.^,^,^ ^t^^ent groups during his two- 

Miss Saieon 4 week visit, including sexeral classes and 

National Student Conference 3 ' "n':,jdition. approximately 400 guests 

Survey of IMSA Graduates 6 from throughout Illinois attended one or 

more of Teller's public lectures on the 
Trailblazers stnicture of matter, science teaching and 

Wellness Prosram 8 relatix ity. 



SIDE 




IMSA senior Elizabeth Pme of 
Chicago called Teller's visit "one of the 
most memorable experiences" of her 
three years at the .4cadem\. "It was 
ama/iiig to be able to talk with him." 
Pine said. "We discussed about e\ery- 

(ciintinucil mi /'i/yc -f) 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 
708/S0I-6000 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Lederman, Nobel Laureate 

Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Trustees 

John Baird 
Teacher of Physics 
Quincy High School 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball. Incorporated 

Dr. Lan7 Braskamp 
Dean, College of Education 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 

President 

BRK Electronics 

Sheila GrilTin 

Director of Corporate Ad\ertismg Worldwide 

Motorola Incorporated 

Cars Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Gary D. Jewel 
Superintendent of Schools 
Aurora West School District #129 

Robert Leininger 
State Superintendent 
State Board of Education 

John McEachern Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Dr. David Mintzer 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Physics and Astronomy 
Northwestern University 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdepartmental Manager 
Department of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Marvin Strunk 

Retired President and Chief Executive Officer 

Madison Bank & Trust Companv 

Dr. Richard Wagner 

Executive Director 

State Board of Higher Educatron 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 

Principal 

Percy Julian Junior High School. Oak Park 

NOVA is published quarterly by the 
IMSA Communications Office. 

Editor 

Catherine C. Veal 

Staff « riter 

Brenda Busehbacher 



From the 

Executive 

Director 




Dear Members of the IMSA Community, 

-^ he Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy has enjoyed a most productive 
and eventful fall semester. The debut of the IMSA Math Jounial. a resource for 
students and teachers throughout Illinois, and the historic two-week visit by Dr. 
Edward Teller are but two of the highlights. Videotapes of Dr. Teller's physics lectures 
are being produced and will be shared with other schools. 

In the area of private sector support, we are most grateful to Illinois Bell for helping 
to underwrite the cost of our 1992 Miss Saigon Gala and for installing fiberoptic cable 
into our Toyota Video Production Laboratory. This is a critical step in building the 
infrastructure for IMSA to provide distance learning opportunities via the telephone 
system to other schools in Illinois. 

In addition, we are testing a new system for designing integrative curriculum (to be 
featured in a future issue of NOVA), and we continue to expand the scope of our work 
in problem-based learning. 

As we begin to see more and more concrete examples of how the R&D work at 
IMSA benefits other schools and teachers, I would like to share with you some recent 
comments by Dr. Donald Kussmaul, superintendent of the East Dubuque Unit District 
No. 119: 

You have taken a dream for education in Illinois and made it reality. The 
East Dubuque School District is located 20 minutes from the "Field of 
Dreams " and I do feel that the statement "build it and they will come " 
applies to IMSA. Build the programs and the students will conw. Provide 
the mindware for the growth of the state and business will come. 

The Illinois Math and Science Academy should be recognized as the 
research base for education in Illinois and the Academy lead for quality 
should be mandated. .\ vision whose time has come. 

We are heartened by Dr. KussmauTs comments, and we appreciate and share his 
commitment to quality education for all children in Illinois. 
Best wishes for the holiday season. 



Sincerelv. 



^-^^-rx^ 



/jy^d^M 



K^ 



Stephanie Pace Marshall, Ph.D. 
Executive Director 



5th Annual NCSSSMST Student Conference 

Students Collaborate on Bioethics Problem 



C^J^ tudents iittondlng the ?lh annual 
^^ — - National Consortium for 
Speciaii/cd Secondary Schools of 
Mathematics. Science and Technology 
(NCSSSMST) student conference spent a 
day traveling into the worlds of medicine, 
science, law, ethics and economics to 
solve a real-world problem. 

During the No\'. 12-14 conference at 
IMSA. students worked togethci- in small 
groups to develop solutions to a problem 
of "Mane's Baby." In the ease, a pregnant 
woman is told that her fetus has 
encephaly. a condition where part of the 
brain is missing. Playing the role of 
Jane's pediatric specialist, students debat- 
ed possible solutions based on their 
research. 

Founded in 19S,S. NCSSSMST consists 
of specialized high schools throughout 
the country that serve talented mathemat- 
ics and science students. The annual stu- 
dent conferences are designed to acquaint 
students of similar interests and abilities 
and to encourage them to work together 
to solve scientific and technological 
problems. 

A total of 200 students from 30 consor- 
tium schools attended. Each school, 
including IMSA. could send up to 10 del- 
egates. 

IMSA delegate Dave Knol of Princeton 
said the most rewarding part of the con- 
ference was being able to interact with 
other students from similar schools and 
learn how other schools operate. "A lot of 
times people think we live in a bubble 
and to get outside and talk with other stu- 
dents in similar situations is very mean- 
ingful." Knol said. 

Delegate Sandra S. Park of W'heaton 
added, "It was interesting to work w ilh 
people from all over the countr\ w ho 
brought in their own backgrounds, ideas 
and \alues." 

Other conference activities included: 
• trips to the University of Chicago. 

Northwestern University. Lake Forest 

College, Shedd Aquarium and Field 

Museum of Natural History in 

Chicaso; and 




SiiiJciil ilclci;<ilcs ilisciiss p( 
pidhlciu. 

• a workshop by E\el\ne Delori. the 
national chapter coordinator for 
Student Pugwash USA. Student 
Pugwash USA is a national, non-profit, 
educational oroanization designed to 



Ijilc-X nii'Jiiiil iiihl cthiciil 



help students better understand the social 
and ethical implications ol science and 
technology. IMSA established the first 
high school chapter of Student Pugwash 
USA in 1988. 



1992-93 Admissions Information 



To help prospective students and par- 
ents learn more about the Academy's 
admissions, academic and residential 
life programs, the following activities 
are scheduled this fall and winter: 
• Statewide Informational Meetings 

(50). Sites include Bradley. 

Carlinville. Chicago (7), Collinsville. 

Crystal Lake. Danville. Decatur. 

Deerfield. DeKalb. Dixon. East St. 

Louis. Effingham. Elgin. Elmhurst. 

E\ anston. Freeport. Galesburg. 

Grayslake. Harvey. Hazel Crest. 

Hoffman Estates. Homewood. 

Jacksonville. Joliet. Lincolnwood. 

Macomb. Marion. Mattoon. 

Maywood. Moliiie. Mt. Vernon. 



Normal. Oglesby. Palos Heights. 
Peoria. Pontiac. Quincy. Robinson. 
Rockford. Springfield. Urbana. 
Vernon Hills. Waukegan and West 
Chicago. 

• Visitor Information Program Days 
(2). These will be held at IMSA at 
1 :00 p.m. on January 9 and 24. 

• Application Deadline. The deadline 
for application to IMSA's eighth 
sophomore class — the Class of 
1996— is March 1. 1993. 

For more information about the 
admissions process, statewide inR)rma- 
tional meetings or VIP Days, call (708) 
801-6027 or \n Illinois 1-800-526-1239. 



IMSA FUND FOR 
ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
President 

James R. Thompson 

Parmer and Chairman of the Executi\ e Committee 

Winston & Strawn 

Executive Vice President 

Donald E. Nordlund 

Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Staley Continental, Inc. 

Vice President 

D. Chet McKee 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Copley Memorial Hospital 

Secretary/Treasurer 

Paul J. O'Hoilaren 
Director General 
Moose International 

Directors 

Linda Anderson 
Civic Leader 

Roger E. Anderson 

Retired Chainnan and Chief Executi\e Officer 

Continental Bank of Chicago 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J, Bail Compan\ 

Marjorie Craig Benton 

President. Chapin Hall Center for Children 

University of Chicago 

Michael J. Birck 
President 
TclUibs. Inc 

Richard H Brown 
President 
Illinois Bell 

Willard Bunn III 

Chairman and Chief Execuli\e Officer 

Banc One Illinois Corporation 

Clifford L. Greenw alt 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Central Illinois Public Sen ice Company 

Susan S. Horwitz 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Aurora National Bank 

John E. Jones 

President. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

CBl Industries 

Dr. Leon M. Lederman. Nobel Laureate 

Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Steven H. Lesnik 

Chairman and Chief Executne Officer 

Lesnik and Company 

Gordon R, Lohman 

President and Chief Executne Officer 

Amsled Industries. Inc. 

James D. Pearson 
President 
.Aurora Industries 

Harry C. Stonecipher 

President and Chief Executi\ e Officer 

Sundstrand Corporation 

William J. White 

President. Chairman and Chief Execuli\'e Officer 

Bell & Howell Company 

Director of Institutional Ad^ ancemcnt 

Ted Parse 



Edward Teller lamtm„cdfroi„pai;c H 

thing from free will to 
the Strategic Defense 
Initiative." 

Sangeeth Peruri of 
Lake Forest added. "I 
don't know if I agree 
with all of his convic- 
tions, but I liked the 
way he believes in his 
convictions." 



IMSA sludciu writer 
Sandra S. Park 
contribulcd to this story. 




Board of Trustees President James D. Pearson (left) and IMSA 
Fund Board President James R. Thompson (right) join Dr. 
Stephanie Pace Marshall in welcoming Dr. Edward Teller to 
IMSA 's campus. 



VIDEOTAPES; To order \ideotapes of Dr. Teller's lectures, contact IMSA's alliance 
office at (708) 801-6989. 



Miss 
Saigon 



Executive Director 
Dr. Stephanie Pace 
Marshall (right) 
presents a plaque 
to Helen Shumate 
of Illinois Bell 
in recognition of the 
company ' v support of 
IMSA's I w: Gala. 
The Miss Saigon 
event raised S25.00I) 
for the IMSA Fund. 




Music Concerts Benefit Hurricane Victims 



Patrons of IMSA's annual fall music 
concerts (October 24 and 25) not only 
enjoyed some wonderful music — they 
also helped the victims of Hurricanes 
Andrew and Iniki. Through voluntary 
donations made at the door, approximate- 
ly S600 was raised for the American Red 
Cross" huiricane relief fund. 

Under the direction of music teachers 
Dalia Bach and Mark Running, the con- 
certs featured the IMSA symphonic wind 



ensemble, symphonic band, and chamber 
and concert choirs. In addition, student 
artwork was sold during the intermis- 
sions, with proceeds also going to the 
Red Cross. 

"The music and art teachers and stu- 
dents felt these benefit concerts would 
provide an opportunity for students to 
share their talents in a tangible way by 
contributing to the needs of others." 
Bach said. 



'fap:- - -il' 



>y^ 



^■^' 



IMSA seniors, IMSA Fund Board President 

James R. Thompson, former Governor of 

Illinois, and his daughter, Samantha, were 

among the guests for the second annual 

Thompson Leadership Lecture. 

(DIG-IT Photographs) 




Patrick LaMaster, IMSA physics teacher, and Dr. Edward Teller 
share ideas about science education. (Photo by Cathy Veal) 



Sophomore Erik Nelson ofBarrington discusses physics theories 
with Dr. Teller. (Photo by Cathy Veal) 



IMSA Launches Math Journal 
for Illinois Teachers and Students 



IMSA mathematics teachers Titu 
Andreescu. Charles Hamberg and George 
Milauskas say "there is something for 
everyone" in the first issue of the IMSA 
Math Journal, distributed to secondary 
schools throughout Illinois this fall. 

The purpose of the journal, the first 
issue of which was developed, edited and 
written by Andreescu, Hamberg and 
Milauskas. is to share mathematical 
ideas, observations and approaches with 
students and math educators. The journal 
may be duplicated for use both in and 
outside the classroom. 

Teachers and students from other 
schools are invited to submit articles. 



problems and solutions for publication in 
future issues. "Our intent is to appeal to a 
diverse audience." Milauskas said, "so 
we welcome interesting items of varying 
degrees of complexity and difficulty." 



.3x + 9 



Concepts in the journal emphasize con- 
nections among different areas of mathe- 
matics. For e.xample, in one section. 
Connections Involving Geometry and 



hu'Liiuilities. students are asked to think of 
and solve algebra and precalculus prob- 
lems in geometrical contexts (see graphic). 

Several of the articles were generated 
from ideas developed by IMSA students. 
"In some cases, student work served as a 
springboai-d for our articles." Hamberg said. 

Andreescu added that the journal may 
enable teachers to identify math talent in 
students through their submissions. 

The goal of the journal, according to all 
three teachers, is "to open the door to 
new ideas for exploration and discovery." 
Work on the second issue of the journal, 
which will be distributed in the spring, is 
under way. 



Survey Shows Uniqueness of IMSA Graduates 



, sur\ey of the Illinois Mathematics 

^_ and Science Academy's (IMSA) 
third graduating class, the Class of 1991, 
indicates the Academy is producing a dif- 
ferent kind of learner — one who sees the 
connections among mathematics, science, 
the arts and humanities, and who values 
ethical considerations in making 
decisions. 

Results of the survey, part of IMSA's 
ongoing longitudinal research program, 
were reported by Dr. Diann Musial, coor- 
dinator of research, at a recent IMSA 
board of trustees meeting. 

For previous studies (Classes of 1989 
and 1990). IMSA had used a comparison 
group of 76 academically talented stu- 
dents identified by the Talent Identifica- 
tion Program at Duke University and the 
Center for the Advancement of Academi- 
cally Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins 
University. This year, the comparison 
group was expanded to include 72 gradu- 
ates of Illinois school districts with histo- 
ries of academic excellence and strong 
honors programs. 

Interviews were conducted by the 
Public Opinion Laboratory based at 
Northern Illinois University. A total of 
105 of the 1 15-member Class of 1991 



responded to the survey. The survey con- 
sisted of 41 forced-choice and open- 
ended questions. Answers were coded by 
independent readers knowledgeable in 
the area of gifted education. 

While there were similarities between 
the two groups" responses, there also 
were important differences. Some of 
these included: 

• IMSA graduates identified the total res- 
idential/academic experience and the 
interaction with other gifted students as 
the most significant factors in their aca- 
demic growth. The comparison group 
graduates identified individual courses 
and extracurricular activities as the 
most significant factors in their aca- 
demic growth. 

• IMSA graduates described "good 
courses" and "effective teaching" 
somewhat differently than did the com- 
parison group, more often defining the 
first in tenns of authenticity (relation to 
real-life issues) and the second in terms 
of the encouragement of individual 
thought. 

• When giving examples of hou' high 
school improved their critical thinking 
and research skills, the comparison 
group cited specific classes while the 



IMSA graduates cited problem-sohing 
and experimental opportunities across 
the curriculum. 

• IMSA graduates provided many exam- 
ples describing how IMSA improved 
their ethical decision-making skills. 
The comparison group offered only a 
few examples in this regard. | 

• Both groups reported satisfaction with I 
their high school preparation, although 
IMSA graduates cited more mathemat- 
ics and science courses. 

• When asked to identify their biggest 
problems in college, the comparison 
group most often cited time manage- s 
ment and being away from home as 
their key concerns. The IMSA gradu- 
ates most often cited concerns about 
aspects of their college academic en\'i- 
ronments which they view as inflexible 
or impersonal. 

Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall, IMSA 
executive director, said the Academy is 
pleased with the findings. "We belie\e 
they validate the unusual and often high- 
risk educational pathway IMSA has cho- 
sen, a pathway that focuses on integrative 
thinking, intellectual exploration, creative ^ 
problem-sohing, leadership development 
and harmonious li\ ina," she said. 



T R A L B L A Z 



State and National 
Leadership 

E\ecLiti\c Director Dr. Stephanie 
Pace Marshall recently gave the keynote 
addresses at the Illinois Association ol' 
Super\ision and Curriculum De\ elop- 
ment (lASCD) annual conference and the 
Illinois State Board of Education's 
Accelerated Schools Netv\ork fall 
conference. 

Sexeral staff members presented work- 
shops at the lASCD conference, includ- 
ing Dr. Diann Musial. coordinator of 
research. Dr. Marcelline Barron, direc- 
tor of academic programs; and teachers 
John Stark. German; Willa Shultz. 
French; John Thompson. biolog_\ ; and 
Margaret Park, physics. 

Dr. Marcelline Barron ga\e a work- 
shop Oct. 24 at a symposium presented 
by the Illinois Prairie Girl Scout Council. 
William Rainey Harper College and the 
American Association of University 
Women. The symposium examined the 
impact of gender equity on achie\enient 
le\els of girls and wnmen. 

Biology teacher Dr. Bobby Hattaway 

presented a workshop at the Illmois 
Science Teachers Association annual 
convention Oct. 2. The workshop was 
designed to help high school teachers 
plan and implement a low-cost field biol- 
ogy program. 

Mathematics teacher Susan Eddins is 

serving on the editorial panel of NCTM 
Stiulcut Math Notes, published by the 
National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics. 

Cathy Veal, director of communica- 
tions, and Barbara Wilson, residential 
program coordinator, were invited pan- 
elists at a recent state conference on ser- 
\'ice learning. The conference, sponsored 
by the Office of the Lieutenant Governor, 
was designed to help others learn more 
about youth community service acti\ i- 
ties. Community service is an IMSA 
graduation requirement. 

Harry Davis, head of instructional 
technology, presented a session at the 
International Visual Literacy Association 
conference Oct. I . Davis also was elect- 
ed to the association's board of directors. 



Student and Staff 
Achievements 

IMSA students Jenny Deller of 
Carbondale. Rachel Kopay of Nev\ 
Lenox. Maggie Lilly of Country Club 
Hills and .\bbey Scott of Metamora 
were in\ ited to present their award-w in- 
ning History Fair project at the Chicago 
Area Women's History Conference on 
Dec. 1 2. Their project depicts the 
impact 20th century American wars 
had on women. 

Eighteen IMSA students and three 
staff members raised more than SI .000 
by participating in AIDS Walk Chicag 
The e\ ent. held Sept. 20. raised more 
than one million dollars for \ arioiis 
Chicago AIDS charities. 

Recipients of this year's innovations 
and initiativ es mini-grants, cash awards 
from the IMSA Fund for Advancement 
of Education, include: Mary Beth 
Esquibel. secretary; Bernard Hollister 
and Dr. Jim Victory, social science 
teachers; Steve (iutierrez. Chantel 
Schuering and Michelle Sharp, resident 
counselois; and Christopher Jocius. ref- 
erence librarian. This |irogram enables 
Academy employees to develop and 
implement creative ideas that support 
IMSA's mission. 

On Sept. 1 1. the Chiai'^^o Trihiinc report- 
ed that members of IMSA's Class of 1 992 
led the nation w ith an a\ erage American 
College Test exam scoie of 30.9. 

A total of 1.^1 IMSA seniors (61% of 
the class) qualified as semifinalists or 
received letters of commendation in this 
year's National Merit Scholarship 
Coiporation competition. In addition, 
three seniors qualified as semifinalists in 
the National Hispanic Scholar Awards 
Program and one senior qualified as a 
semifinalist in the National Achievement 
Scholarship Program for Outstanding 
Negro Students. 

Student Michael Hsu of 01\mpia 
Fields was appointed Concert Master of 
the Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestra. 
Hsu pla\s the \ iolin. 




IMSA sciUiir Eli:iihclh Pint i\ i iin^uiluliitccl 
hv Dr. Janice .V. Kaliii. prcMilciil <-/ llic 
Minciiiii III Si iciuc mid liuliisirx. ii\ the w in- 
ner dl ihc Mu\cnni\ l'-)'-l2 Dul^iinnlin:^ )'<nnii; 
Siicnlisl niinpcUlid}]. For her achic\cin(itl\. 
\/;c nin awiinlcd a Irip to the Sohcl Pn:c 
Ci'remiinu s in Swi'iUii in /)<'i c/ii/'cr. 
(Photo ciuiilcsv (if ihu .Miisciini of .Science 
and Indusliv ). 



G. .Allen .Mayer. '9(1. Lhiiversity of 
Chicago, was elected Democratic 
Committeeman in the March primary and 
was a delegate to the 1992 Illinois 
Democratic State Convention. 

Sean Pritchard. '90. West Point, was 
awarded the Distinguished Cadet Award 
for ranking in the top 57c academically in 
his class. He also receixed the Super- 
intendent's Award for excellence in 
academic, military and physical de\elop- 
ment. 

Erin Lott. '92. Denison Uni\ersit_\. 
was named one of 55 winners nationally 
of Denison's Heritage Scholarship. 



Wellness Program Promotes Healthy Living 



Eighteenth century EngHsh author 
Samuel Johnson once said. "Life 
is very short, and very uncertain; let us 
spend it as well as we can." Although the 
definition of wellness has evolved over 
time, the goal has remained the same. 

"We want students to make positive 
decisions today and throughout their 
lives about maintaining their good health 
and well-being." said John Martin, well- 
ness team leader. 

Beginning this fall, all sophomores are 
taking IMSA's new wellness course, 
which was piloted for one semester in 
1991. The course addresses the physical. 
emotional and psychological develop- 
ment of students through the integration 
of health and physical education courses. 

In addition, juniors and seniors partici- 
pate in one structured exercise program 
each semester. 

Principal John Court calls the program 
an "exciting initiative with far-reaching 
implications." adding "we want to pro- 
vide our students with the lifetime skills 
needed to take on leadership roles, be 
productive and compete in the global 
community in the future." 

In the course, students meet two days 
for classroom activities and two days for 
physical activity. Wellness teachers John 
Martin. Nancy Todnem and Barbara 
Baber use the cooperative learning 
approach which de-emphasizes competi- 
tion. Although a textbook is not used, 
students are required to maintain a jour- 
nal and notebook, develop a personal 




Dr. Grt'ii Miicci lends a class in T'ai Chi. a Cluitese iiumial art eiiipliasizinti rfkixiilion 
techniques. 



wellness plan and fitness assessments, 
and take several exams and quizzes. 

The curriculum focuses on the whole 
person including five dimensions — phys- 
ical, emotional, mental/intellectual, 
social and spiritual/philosophical. 

In addition to personal physical fitness, 
topics include values, ethics, decision- 
making, stress management, human sex- 
uality and relationships, consumer and 
environmental health, nutrition, first aid 
and substance abuse. 

IMSA sophomore Elizabeth Liu of 
Chicago said the program is especially 
valuable at IMSA. where students need 
healthy outlets. "Personally. I found the 
relaxation techniques to be very helpful." 
she said. "Before taking the class. I never 
really thought about ways to relieve 
stress and tension." 



Social worker Cheryl McGuirk said the 
program also is designed to help IMSA 
students make the emotional and social 
adjustment to being away from home. 
"Since we're asking students to deal with 
things we didn't have to deal with until 
1 8 or so. we have a special responsibility 
to help them develop the skills to succeed 
in a residential setting," she said. 



Illinois educators who would like to 
learn more about IMSA's wellness 
program are invited to attend one of 
three "Wellness Visitation Days." 
These will be held March 1 , 3 and 8. 
To make reservations, contact Jerre 
Henriksen at 708-801-6058. 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 



NONPROFIT ORG. 

BULK RATE 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA. IL 

PERMIT NO. 129 



Address Correction Requested 



ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r^llVI^A '^ Pioneering Ediicutional CniuDiiiiiity 



Volume 7 No. 2 • Winter 1993 



UPDATE: School District Partners Report Progress 



Two years ago. we reported on the new 
IMSA/Motorola Universin,' initiative to 
help school districts improve tlieir 
mathematics and science proi^rams. 
Recently, we aslied three of the dis- 
tricts — Alton. Pekin and Mt. Vernon — 
to reflect on wluit they have accom- 
plished so far ami w hat they hope to 
accomplish in the future. 



r~ /, ichele Maki. Dr. Nick Osborne 
L^ L and Dr. Peter McFarlane have 
a lot in common — they love public 
education, are dedicated to their local 
school districts, value teamwork and 
welcome change. They also agree that 
participating in the IMSA/Motorola 
University District Learning Leadership 
Teams (DLLT) initiatise has benefitted 
their districts. 

The DLLT initiative, which seeks to 
improve mathematics, science and tech- 
nology education through a systemwide 
restructuring and change process, is 
being piloted in 29 Illinois school dis- 
tricts and Northeastern Illinois 
Uni\ersitv. Each teatii has 10-12 



SIDE 



From the Executive Director 2 

Good Morning America. BBC-TV 3 

IMSA Fund Highlights 5 

National Education Conference 3 

Neison Harris S750.000 Grant 4 

Recycling Program 6 

Trailblazers 7 

U.S. Senate Youth Proeram 8 



members or "stakeholders" representing 
all areas of the school district including 
the board of education, superintendents, 
teachers, principals, parents, business 
leaders and community members. 

Pekin: Decision-Making. 
Strategic Plan Improve 

In a recent interview, Maki. director of 
special programs in Pekin Public School 
District #108. said participating in the 
DLLT initiative since October of 1 990 
has impacted the way 
decisions are made 
at all levels in her 
district. 

"People on the 
team have 
learned new 
w ays of interact- 
ing with others, run- 
ning meetings and 
making deci- 
sions." Maki 
said. "Virtually 
everything in 
the district has 
changed as a 
result of this. 

In addition. 
Maki said the 
district's strategic 
plan is more "far- 
reaching" because of 
knowledge gained by 
participating in the 
DLLT initiative. 

Mt. Vernon: 
School-Community Ties 
Strengthened 

Osborne, assistant superin- 
tendent of Mt. Vernon City 
School District #80. said 



his district has learned a lot by involving 
community members in the decision- 
making process. "It's an excellent way to 
link the community to the schools." 
Osborne said. "Plus, input from this 
cross-section of community representa- 
tives lends credibility to our decisions." 

(continued on page 5) 



Miuy Lou DiGioia. a teacher in 
Mt. Prospect District #57. leads 
discussion during a recent District 
Learning Leadership Team 
meeting at IMSA. 




r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academv 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 
708/801-6000 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Ledemian. Nobel Laureate 

Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Trustees 

John Baird 
Teacher of Physics 
Quincy High School 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball, Incorporated 

Dr. Larry Braskamp 
Dean, College of Education 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 

President 

BRK Electronics 

Forest Etheredge 
Retired State Senator 
Instructor, Aurora University 

Sheila Griffm 

Director of Corporate Advertising Worldwide 

Motorola Incorporated 

Cary Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Gary D. Jewel 
Superintendent of Schools 
Aurora West School Distnct #129 

Robert Leininger 
State Superintendent 
State Board of Education 

John McEachem Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Dr. David Mintzer 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 

Physics and Astronomy 
Northwestern University 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdepartmental Manager 
Department of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Marvin Strunk 

Retired President and Chief Executive Officer 

Madison Bank & Trust Company 

Dr. Richard Wagner 

Executive Director 

State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 

Principal 

Percy Julian Junior High School. Oak Park 

NOVA is published quarterly by the 
IMSA Communications Office. 

Editor 

Catherine C. Veal 

Staff Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 



From the 

Executive 

Director 




Dear Members of the IMSA Community, 

lii~ his continues to be an eventful year for the Illinois Mathematics and Science 

■ Academy. In the area of institutional advancement, we recently were honored to 
receive a major grant from the Neison Hanis Family Foundation along with significant 
support from other first-time and repeat donors. 1992-93 already has been a record 
fundraising year, and we still have several months to go! 

In admissions, we welcomed 1.500 guests to two Visitor Information Program Days 
in January. It is always a pleasure to introduce prospective students and parents from 
throughout Illinois to our campus. The deadline for student applications was March 1. 

E.xternal programs serving educators and students throughout Illinois continue to 
expand. We have invited students for IMSA Summer "AD" Ventures and have awarded 
another group of IMPACT II teaching grants. 

The Center for Problem-Based Learning is engaged in teacher training, and we 
continue to work closely with a number of District Learning Leadership Teams from 
throughout Illinois (see cover article). In addition, we have produced videotapes of 
Dr. Edward Teller's physics lectures at IMSA last fall to share with other schools" 
science programs. 

Recently, we also enjoyed hosting the fifth annual conference of the Midwest 
Consortium of Suburban and Independent Schools and serving as the distance learning 
classroom for Ameritech's SuperSchooI Project demonstration. 

Internally, as we look ahead to the spring, I am pleased to announce that NASA 
astronaut Dr. Mae Jemison will be the speaker at the June 5 Commencement of the 
Class of 1993. We also are preparing for the annual meeting to update our strategic 
plan. Much has been accomplished as a result of the plan, and we look forward to our 
continuing journey. 

Sincerely, 



Stephanie Pace Marshall. Ph.D. 
Executive Director 



PREVIEW: IMSA To Unveil Innovative Curriculum 
System at National Education Conference 



'n ^ he national education comnuinity 

l—j once again will have its eyes on 
the Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy as it unveils its new integrative 
learning system (ILS) at the 48th annual 
conference of the Association for 
Supervision and Cuniculum 
Development (ASCD) March 27-30 ni 
Washington, D.C. 

ASCD is the nation's largest education 
leadership organization. IMSA Executive 
Director Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall 
serves as its president and will preside at 
the conference. Thousands of educators 
from Illinois, the nation and several for- 
eign countries will attend. 

The ILS provides the framework for 
the creation of new currriculum for 
IMSA"s school program and external pro- 
grams like Summer 'AD'Veutiires. Core 
courses such as sophomore physics. 



chemistry. English and mathematical 
investigations are being revised using the 
ILS this school year. The system supports 
cuiricula that foster the development of 
integrative thinkers who see interrela- 
tionships across disciplines instead of 
in isolation. 

In addition to the ILS. which will be 
presented by Dr. Michael Palmisano, 
director of assessment and research, and 
Dr. Marcelline Barron, director of aca- 
demic programs, IMSA staff will present: 

• Umlcrstaiuliiii; the Vision. Meaning 
anil Language of Educational 
Transformation. Dr. Marshall 

• Creating a Conininninity for Discovery: 
Scientists, Scholars and Stiiilenls. 

Dr. Peggy Connolly, mentorship 
coordinator 



• An Integrated Curriculum 
Development Project. Susan Eddins. 
mathematics teacher: John Thompson, 
biology teacher 

• A Study of Gender Differences in 
Mathematics and Science Interest 
Among Gifted Students. Dr. Diann 
Musial. coordinator of research; 
Dr. Banon 

• Using Students' Ratings of Courses for 
Improving Curriculum and Instruction, 
Dr. Palmisano; Dr. Connie Hatcher, 
director of personnel and planning. 

In addition, IMSA trustee G. Carl Ball, 
chairman of the board of George J. Ball, 
Inc. in West Chicago, has been named an 
ASCD Distinguished Lecturer and will 
speak on the topic of life-long alliances 
and partnerships. 



Good Morning America and BBC-TV Showcase IMSA 



Reporters and film crews from 
ABC-TV"s Good Morning 
America and BBC-TV's The Money 
Programme recently roamed IMSA's cor- 
ridors and classrooms as part of nation- 
wide features on Dr. Leon Lederman and 
the U.S. economy. 




IM.SA physics teacher Fulrick LaMaster looks 
on as Dr. Lederman sii;us cm uutoiirciph for 
IMSA junior Elise Sivilax. 



In December. The Money 
Programme visited the campus 
and several businesses in 
Aurora as part of a documentary 
on the U.S. economy examining 
cooperation between the public 
and private sector. The show 
aired in Britain Jan. 17 and was 
sent four times via satellite to 
Continental Europe, Asia, 
Africa and Australia. 

The program featured 
IMSA physics teacher Patrick 
LaMaster instructing students 
at IMSA and off-site at 
Oswego High School through 
the two-way, audio-visual Telecommuni- 
cations InstRictional Consortium system. 

On Feb. 1 . Good Morning America 
aired a human interest story on the life 
and work of Dr. Leon Lederman, vice- 
president of IMSA's board of trustees. In 
the segment, Ledemian was shown guest 
lecturing in IMSA's topics in modern 
physics class. 




Good Morning America /;7/h,s Dr. Li 
lecluriii}; at lALS.A. 



Icrmun truest 



Lederman, director emeritus of Fermi 
National Accelerator Laboratory in 
Batavia, is a professor at the Illinois 
Institute of Technology. In 1988, he was 
awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics. 
His new book. The God Particle: If the 
Universe is the Answer, What is the 
Question?, now is available in 
bookstores nationwide. 



IMSA FUND FOR 
ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
President 

James R. Thompson 
Chairman 
Winston & Strawn 

Executive Vice President 

Donald E. Nordlund 

Retired Chainmm and Chief Exe 

Slalev Continental, Inc. 



^Offic 



Vice President 

D. Chet McKee 

President and Chief Executive Office 

Copley Memorial Hospital 



Secretary /Treasurer 




Paul J. O'Hollaren 




Director General 




Moose International 




Directors 


Linda Anderson 


John E. Jones 


Cnic Leader 


President. Chairman and 


Roger E. Anderson 


Chief Executive Officer 
CBI Industries 


Retired Chairman and 




Chief Executive Office 


r Dr. Leon M. Lederman, 


Continental Bank of 


Nobel Laureate 


Chicago 


Director Emeritus 


G. Carl Ball 


Fermi National 


Cliairman of the Board 


Accelerator Laboratory 


George J. Ball Company 


Steven H. Lesnik 


Marjorie Craig Benton 


Chairman and Chief 


President 


Executive Officer 


Chapin Hall Center for 


Lesnik and Company 


Children 


Gordon R. Lohman 


University of Chicago 


President and Cliief 


Michael J. Birck 


Executive Officer 


President 


Amsted Industnes. Inc. 


Tellabs, Inc. 


Ronald L. Nicol 


Richard H. Brown 


Vice President 


President 


The Boston Consulting 


Illinois Bell 


Group 


Willard Bunn III 


James D. Pearson 


Chairman and Ctiief 


President 


Exective Officer 


Aurora Industnes 


Banc One Illinois 
Corporation 


James T. Schaefer 


Real Estate Consultant 


Dr Floyd English 


Harry C. Stonecipher 


President and Cliief 


President and Chief 


Executive Officer 


Executive Officer 


Andrew Corporation 


Sundstrand Corporation 


Clifford L. Greenwalt 


Richard Weliek 


President and Chief 


President and Chief 


Executive Officer 


Executive Officer 


Central Illinois Public 


Varlen Corporation 


Service Company 






William J. White 


Susan S. Horwitz 


President. Chairman and 


President and Chief 


Chief Executive Officer 


Executive Officer 


Bell & Howell Company 


Aurora National Bank 




Leon Jackson 




President 




Multi-Fac Corporation 




Director of Institutional Advancement 1 


Ted Parge 





IMSA Fund Receives Largest 
Private Grant In History 

Tops One Million Mark for 1992'9\ 

H — he Illinois Mathematics and 

Li Science Academy has recei\'ed a 
$750,000 challenge grant from Neison 
Harris of The Hams Family Foundation 
to support its national Center for 
Problem-Based Learning. 

Harris is chairman of the board and 
director of the Pittway Corporation in 
Chicago. 

This is the Academy's largest private 
gift, and it marks the first time the IMSA 
Fund has exceeded the $1 million mark 
in fundraising in a given fiscal year. 

Established in 1992. the Center coordi- 
nates research, teacher training, curricu- 
lum development, evaluation and infor- 
mation exchange in this emerging field of 
innovation for K-12 classrooms. William 
Stepien, social science teacher, serves as 
its director. 

The Neison and Bette Harris Institute 
within the Center will provide staffing to 
develop and distribute problem-based 
learning materials. 




Nei.son Harris 



This is the Academy's largest 
private gift, and it marks the first 
time the IH^SA Fund has exceed- 
ed the $1 million mark in fund- 
raising in a given fiscal year. 

Problem-based learning first was used 
in IMSA's award- winning Science, 
Socien and the Fntiire course, taught by 
Stepien and Dr. David Workman, physics 
teacher, and funded by the Hitachi 
Foundation. This approach organizes the 
curriculum around "ill structured" prob- 
lems that require students to use knowl- 
edge and skills from many subjects in 
developing solutions. 

Last year. IMSA's work was featured 
at a national Wingspread Conference and 
in several education publications, 
prompting more than 1.000 inquiries 



from the U.S. and abroad. The Center 
now is working with teachers in Illinois 
and several other states. 

Harris said he is happy to provide 
venture capital for the Center. "I am 
captivated by this highly promising 
teaching strategy, and I hope my chal- 
lenge grant will leverage an additional 
$750,000 for IMSA and the Center from 
other corporations, foundations and 
indi\ iduals." he said. 

Former Illinois governor James R. 
Thompson, president of the IMSA Fund 
board of directors, thanked Harris for his 
contribution and commitment to educa- 
tional reform, "Not only does his gift rep 
resent the largest donation in IMSA's hi,'- 
tory, it also represents a strong 
commitment to changing the way teach- 
ing and learning are done in our schools,' 
he said. 



IMSA Fund Strengthens Base 



I II addition to the Neison Harris gi'ant 
L (see page 4). the IMSA Ftind for 
Ad\ ancenient of Edueation continues to 
build on previous successes. Among the 
recent highhghts: 

• New corporate and foundation donors 

of $?()() orniore( August 1. 1992- 
February 15. 1993) include: 

Alherto-Cuher Company 

Andrew Foundation 

Archer Daniels Midland Company 

Helen M. Galvin Charitable Trust 

The Harris Family Foundation 

Industrial Bank of Japan Ltd. 

The Interlake Corporation 

Lindberg Corporation 

Montgomery Ward and Compan\ . Inc. 

Novell. Inc. 

Scott Foresman & Company 



Sears Roebuck Foundation 
Washington National Foundation 

• Caterpillar. Noell. Illinois Bell 
Support. A $73,000 gi-ant from the 
Cateipillar Foundation will support 
unique professional development oppor- 
tunities for IMSA teachers — opportuni- 
ties to help them develop innovati\ e 
approaches to teaching and learning for 
use at IMSA and in other Illinois schools. 
Novell donated approximately $56,000 
worth of computer software to enable 
IMSA to upgrade its networking capabil- 
ities, and Illinois Bell installed fiber optic 
cable valued at S25.000 in several areas. 
This increases IMSA's capacity for 
broadcasting classes, lectures, special 
e\ents. etc. 




School District Partners 

iconunucd from pti'^c I ) 

The team is exploring ways to increase 
hands-on applications of technology in 
the classroom. "One of our action plans 
calls for establishing computer networks 
in schools so all classrooms will have 
access to a file server containing pro- 
grams to assist instruction in math and 
science." Osborne said. "Also, we hope 
to enhance applied math and physics 
skills in our middle schools using com- 
puter-assisted programs for technical 
drafting and drawing." 

Alton: Technology Plan Takes Shape 

Technology also is an important issue 
for Alton Community Unit School 
District #11. Assistant Superintendent Dr. 
Peter McFarlane said the team's invohe- 
ment in the DLLT initiative has led to the 
development of a five-year technology 
plan. "The plan involves a systemwide 
upgrading of technology that will focus 
on telecommunications, technology- 
assisted learning, interactive technology 
and a technology media center." he said. 

Dinah Simmen. IMSA coordinator for 
the DLLT initiative, said she is 
impressed by the progress made by these 
and other teams in such a short amount of 
time. "The process for systemic change is 
by nature slow." Simmen said. "It takes 
time for people to move through the pain 
of change to a sustainable vision." 

Maki agreed. "It's a constant process 
of re-evaluation and renewal." she said. 
"We're never going to be there but we 
always need to strive to get there and 
redefine what "there' is." 

Osborne. McFarlane and Maki said 
that working with IMSA and Motorola 
University has served their districts and 
communities well. "IMSA has made it 
very clear that they have a commitment 
to improve instruction across the state." 
Osbome said. "We appreciate their com- 
mitment and look forward to continuing 
our partnership in the future." 



Ainocci C(irp<iniliiin Si-iiinr Riwcanh Associate Dr. G. J(>'.fph Rci\ aiul Murv Win \'cr\t. IMSA 
(.hcniislrv Icmher. discuss uiiclair nuitiiictic resoiuiiicc instrumeiiuitiim. This mnl otiicr suitc-ot- 
thc-arl ci./iiipiiicnt arc iivuiliMc to sliulcins in IMSA 's Amoco Or'^amc Cliemi\tn- Lob(>rot(>n. 



Recycling Program Revisited, Refined, Revitalized 



By Sandra S. Park, 
Student Writer 

r\ ^^ oving from consideration to 
,V_ L commitment, campiiswide recy- 
cling now seems alive and well 
at IMSA. 

The idea for campuswide recycling 
came from two former students who were 
members of IMSA Student Pugwash. 
Student Pugwash USA is a national orga- 
nization designed to help students better 
understand the social and ethical implica- 
tions of science and technology. IMSA 
established the first high school chapter 
of Student Pugwash USA in 1988. 

Today, the IMSA recycling program is 
picking up steam with more manpower, 
more resources and more efficient ser- 
vice. This year, the number of recycling 
work service students increased by a 
third, with one student responsible for 
each residence hall and 14 students 
responsible for the academic building. 
Their duties include transporting materi- 
als from indoor recycling bins to outdoor 
bins which are collected free of charge by 
Able Disposal and Recycling Services in 
West Chicago. 

Recycling bins are located at numerous 
locations campuswide. Last year, only 
aluminum cans, cardboard and high- 
grade paper could be recycled. However, 
this year the Wal-Mart Foundation donat- 
ed permanent recycling bins that hold 
glass, metal, plastic and aluminum cans. 
(Other businesses or individuals interest- 
ed in donating bins should call Ted 
Parge, director of in.stitutional advance- 
ment at 708-80 1 -6040. ) 

Noah Rosenberg, a recycling work ser- 
vice student, said there is a heightened 
awareness of recycling and a change in 
attitude among students and staff. "Now. 
if people see a recycling bin, they will 
usually walk over to it instead of throw- 
ing something away in the garbage can 
next to them," he said. 



Currently, IMSA is required to include 
25% recycled paper in its paper purchases. 
By the year 1996, this figure will increase 
to 40% of the total paper bought. 

Resident Counselor Andrea Swenson, 
who supervises the recycling work ser- 
vice students, noted that such laws 
present a challenge for society. "We 
need to continue to find more markets for 
recycled goods," she said. "Otherwise, 
we will be recycling materials that won't 
be used for anything later." 

Santlra S. Park, a senior from Wliearon, 
is CI work ser\'ice student in the IMSA 
conuminications office. 



Why recycle? 



Just consider a few 
statistics... 

• Only 107f of all trash is recycled. 

• Each ton of high-grade paper recy- 
cled saves 7000 gallons of water. 

• 25-32% of the energy utilized to 
make glass is saved by recycling 
glass 

• $1 of every $1 1 Americans spend 
on food is for the packaging. 

Source: The Recxciers' Handbook. 
J 990. 




Up, Up and 
Away... 

Randy Clark of 
Adventures Aloft in 
Woodstock demonstrates 
an application of 
thermodynamics for 
IMSA students and staff. 



T R A I L B L A Z E 



State and National 
Leadership 

Executive Director Dr. Stephanie 
Pace Marshall gave two presentations. 
The Panulii^ni Change Required in 
Ediieation and Learning Conunitnities 
and a case study of IMSA. at the 
Singapore Annual General Meeting 
and Mini-Conference of the Association 
for Supervision and Curriculum 
Development Feb. 8-14. William 
Stepien, director of the Center for 
Problem-Based Learning, also presented 
a session. 

Dr. LuAnn Smith, director of admis- 
sions, and Ogden Spruill, head academic 
advisor, presented Programs for 
Enhancement and Achievement of 
Academic Goals Among Minority- Youth 
at the second annual national conference 
of the Quality Education for Minorities 
in Mathematics, Science and Engineering 
Network Feb. 12-14 in Washington. D.C. 

Deborah Guffy, dean of student ser- 
vices, ga\ e the keynote address at the 
Dec. graduation ceremony of the College 
of Health, Physical Education. 
Recreation and Athletics at Eastern 
Kentucky University. 

Recent presentations b\ mathematics 
teachers included: Chuck Hamberg, 
Integrating Discrete Mathematics into 
the Secondary Math Curriculum 
(National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics, Las Vegas): and Sue 
Eddins, From Attributes to Insights. 
George Milauskas, Learning Through 
Problems, and Titu .Andreescu. 
Matliematical Induction: An Elegant and 
Poweiful Method (fourth annual 
Metropolitan Mathematics Club 
Conference, Flossmoor, IL). 

Mark Running, music teacher. v\as 
inaugurated as president of District VII 
of the Illinois Music Educators 
Association during the recent all-state 
music festival in Peoria. 

Social worker Cheryl McGuirk and 
biology teacher Dr. Susan Styer present- 
ed Girls and Self-Esteem and Trends in 
Math cmd Science Feb. 6 at a conference 
co-sponsored by the American 
Association of University Women and 
St. Charles C.U.S.D. #303. 



Student Achievements 

A total of 65 IMSA seniors have 
qualified as finalists in this year's 
National Merit Coiporation Scholarship 
competition. 

Kani Ilangovan of Palos Heights 
was chosen from 6.4(.)() artists 
nationwide to participate in ARTS |F 
Week "93 in Miami Jan. 6-10. 
There, she was awarded 3rd place 
and a scholarship in the writing com- 
petition by the National Foundation 
for Advancement in the Arts. 

Sixteen students were named to this 
year's all-state band, orchestra and 
chorus by the Illinois Music Educators 
Association. 

A computer games program. 
BeiujiWars. written by senior Steve 
Crutchfield of Chicago, is featured m 
the book MacArcade: Don Rittner's Top 
Shareware Game Picks published this 
year by Ventana Press. The book and 
accompanying floppy disk feature the top 
ten games nationally; Crutchfield's game 
receixed the tiiird place award. 

Two days after his 16th birthda\. 
IMSA student Niccolo Delia Penna of 
Mokena received a student pilot certifi- 
cate to operate a powered aiiplane in solo 
flight. 

.A team of six students finished first in 
the third annual Greater Decatur 
Invitational Scholastic Bowl Tournament 
held in Dec. against .54 other high 
schools. IMSA student Noah Rosenberg 
of Chicago was the top scorer in the tour- 
nament. 

A team of 15 students finished first in 
Illinois in the Knowledge Master Open 
competition held in December. The team 
placed 10th out of 1.614 schools in the 
nation. 

Adam Duston of Palatine. Genevieve 
Lakier of Deeifiekl. Toshio Kimura of 
Des Plaines and Abbey Scott of 
Metamora, were named outstanding dele- 
gates at Model United Nations at the 
University of Chicago Jan. 28-31. Only 
48 students out of 1800 nationwide were 
so named. 




Gregg Worrell (right). IMSA director of 
business and finance, is "arrested" for 
"overworking his office staff. " His bad 
raised immev for the March of Dimes. 



Alumni Achievements 

Deborah Shepard. '41, University of 
Illinois-Urbana, was appointed as Region 
4 Student Representati\'e for the Institute 
of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 
(IEEE) representing 59 universities and 
colleges in the world. 

Walter Lee, '92, George Washington 
University, was one of four student rep- 
resentatives elected to serve on the 14- 
member Student Pugwash USA Board of 
Directors. 

Anthony Tosi, "90, Beloit College, 
w as aw aided a 1 992 PICAS Student 
Language Fellowship for Japanese and is 
attending Kansai Gaidai University in 
Osaka, Japan, this semester. 

Nancy Young, '89. University of 
Illinois-Urbana. received the Outstanding 
Graduate in East Asian Studies Award. 



Mr. Pritchard Goes to Washington 



MSA senior Matt Pritchard said he 
wasn't the only person in Washington, 
D.C., who enjoyed mixing poHtics with 
music. "Suiprisingly, there were a lot of 
other student delegates who also played 
the tenor sax," he joked. 

Pritchard, a Hinckley resident, recently 
returned from a weeklong trip to 
Washington as one of two Illinois dele- 
gates to the 31st Annual United States 
Senate Youth Program Jan. 30-Feb. 6. 

Pritchard was chosen based on his aca- 
demic record and involvement in student 
government. This year he is IMSA's 
student council president. 

During his trip. Pritchard visited 
numerous Washington landmarks includ- 
ing the White House, the Lincoln 



Memorial and the Capitol. However, he 
said his most memorable experience was 
watching politics in its truest form during 
one of the most heated Senate floor 
debates in recent history The issue 
was gays in the militai> 



In addition to sightseeing and intensive 
sessions on the federal government, 
Pritchard met First Lady Hilary Clinton, 
Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, 
and Senators Paul Simon, Carol 

Moseley Braun. John Keiry 
ind Pete Domenici. 




r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora, Illinois 60506-1000 



NON PROFIT ORG. 

BULK RATE 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA, IL 

PERMIT NO. 129 



Address Correction Requested 




'Em 



ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r'^^IIVI^A '^ Fioiiecriiig Ediiccitioinil Cdniiuuiiity 



Volume 7 No. 3 • Spniiy 1993 



IMSA Senior Wins Prestigious Westinghouse 
Science Talent Search Competition 



PMSA senior Elizabeth Pine appeared 
"'cool as a cucumber" speaking about 
mushrooms to a nationwide audience 
during an interview with CBS anchor 
Paula Zahn the morning of March 9. 

At an awards banquet the night before, 
however. Pine was anything but "coor" 
after winning first place and a $40,000 
scholarship in the 52nd Westinghouse 
Science Talent Search competition. "This 
is past exciting," she said. "This is shock!" 

That evening. Pine became the eighth 
female to win first prize in the nation's 
oldest science competition for high 
school students. In her award-winning 
research project, "A Mushrooming 
Expose," Pine used DNA sequencing 
technologies to demonstrate that two 
kinds of fungi which now are classified 
separately and appear very different are 
in fact each other's closest relatives. 

As one of 40 national finalists. Pine 
attended a five-day Science Talent 
Institute in Washington, D.C. March 4-9 
where she was judged by a board of eight 
distinguished scientists. One was Nobel 
Laureate Glenn Seaborg who said the 
competition looks to recognize outstand- 



SIDE 



Admissions Invitations 3 

IMPACT II Teacher Network 3 

Mentorship Research 6 

Miss Illinois American Coed 8 

Special Events 4. 3 

Summer 'AD' Ventures 3 

Trailblazers 7 



ing research and predict 
future success. 

"We are looking for the 
person's potential as a scien- 
tist." he said. "I look for the 
ability to think: a certain mini- 
mal amount of knowledge, of 
course, but more important, 
creativity, if I can discern it." 
(Phares, 1990) 

Many previous w inners ha\e 
gone on to positions of national 
and international leadership in 
their respective fields. Pine 
now joins the ranks of previous 
Westinghouse winners who 
have won five Nobel prizes, 
two Fields Medals in mathe- 
matics, eight MacAnhur 
Fellowships and two National 
Medals of Science. In addition. 
28 Westinghouse winners are 
members of the National 
Academy of Sciences, three 
are members of the National 
Academy of Engineering and 
51 are Sloan Rese;u'ch Fellows. 

The days following the 
competition proved to be a 
"mushrooming" experience for 
Pine as she was interviewed by 
state, national and international 
media. Since then the public attention has 
subsided, but the effects of being a 
Westinghouse winner may vei7 well last a 
lifetime. 

"Winning the Westinghouse Scholarship 
made all the difference in my life," .said Dr. 
Paul Teschan, the first winner, 1942. "Even 
more impoiiant, however, winning gave me 
an absolutelv tremendous sense that it was 




EHziihetli Pine deiiion^iitiii 
ii'sc'dich Icchii'uiiu's. 



iwurd-winning 



possible for me to achieve success in sci- 
ence," he said. (Phares, 1990) 

Pine, who will attend Harviud Univer- 
sity, plans to major in biological research. 



Phares. T. ( 1990). Scckm}^ and Fimlmii Scieiia 
Taleni: A 50-year Hisioiy aj the Wextiimlioiise 
Scieiiee Taleni Search. Pittsburgh: Westing- 
house Electric Corporation. 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 
708/907-5000 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Lederman, Nobel Laureate 

Direcrcr Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Trustees 

John Baird 
Teacher of Physics 
Quincy High School 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball. Incorporated 

Dr. Larry Braskamp 
Dean, College of Education 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 

President 

BRK Electronics 

Forest Etheredge 
Retired State Senator 
Instructor. Aurora University 

Sheila Griffin 

Director of Corporate Advertising Worldwide 

Motorola Incorporated 

Cary Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Gary D. Jewel 
Superintendent of Schools 
Aurora West School District #129 

Robert Leininger 
State Superintendent 
State Board of Education 

John McEachem Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Dr. David Mintzer 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Physics and Astronomy 
Northwestern University 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdeparttnental Manager 
Department of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Marvin Strunk 

Retired President and Chief Executive Officer 

Madison Bank & Trust Company 

Dr. Richard Wagner 

Executive Director 

State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 

Principal 

Percy Julian Junior High School. Oak Park 

NOVA is published quarterly by the 
IMSA Communications Office. 

Editor 

Catherine C. Veal 

Staff Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 



From the 

Executive 

Director 




Dear Members of the IMSA Community. 

As we prepare to complete the Academy's seventh school year. 1 would like to 
report on several recent highlights. 

This spring, the Academy's strategic planning team reconvened to complete another 
annual review and update of our strategic plan. The new plan, which is now in draft 
form, strengthens the institution's commitment to the transfonnation of mathematics 
and science teaching and learning. Faculty, staff, parents, students and community 
members will work this summer and fall to develop action plans: afterwards, the entire 
strategic plan will be presented to the board of trustees for consideration and approval. 
After that, more information on the new plan, which proposes several significant 
changes, will be shared in NOVA. 

In terms of private sector support. I am delighted to report that this has been a record 
year for the IMSA Fund for Advancement of Education. With several weeks remaining 
in this fiscal year, the IMSA Fund already has raised approximately $1.2 million, 
surpassing the previous record (last year) of $964,000. More information on the IMSA 
Fund's success will be reported in the next issue of NOVA. 

We enjoyed hosting CNN Science and Technology News May 5. CNN filmed 
several labs and classes for a feature on IMSA and science education. 

On a personal note, as we bid a fond farewell to the Class of 1993. 1 would like to 
thank our seniors and their parents for their support and commitment during the past 
three years. Members of the Class of 1993 have distinguished themselves in many 
ways, and we wish them happiness and success in all their future endeavors. 



Sincerely. 



Stephanie Pace Marshall. Ph.D. 
Executive Director 



k^ 



IMPACT II Teaching Network Expands; 
IMSA Sponsors Network Conference 



In addition to serving Illinois students 
and teachers through Summer 
'AD'Veutures. the IMSA-administered 
IMPACT II network has awarded adaptor 
and disseminator teaching awai'ds to anoth- 
er 248 Illinois teachers. For the first time, 
many IMPACT II teachers presented their 
award-winning projects at a statewide 
Teacher's Network Conference May 22. 

IMPACT II. a national program, began 
in 1979 and now operates in 26 sites 
throughout the country. Its purpose is to 
promote excellence in elementary and 
secondary education by networking 
teachers and their innovative ideas. 
Nearly 800 teachers are members of 
Illinois' IMPACT II program which 
focuses on mathematics and science 
education and is funded primarily by the 
State Board of Education. 

IMSA also receives support for addi- 
tional grants from the private sector. 



Donors include Continental Bank 
(Chicago). Central Illinois Public Service 
Company (Springfield). Gary-Wheaton 
Bank (Aurora). Household International. 
Inc. (Prospect Heights) and Washington 
National Insurance (E\'anston). 

This spring. 57 disseminator awai'ds were 
given to 1 10 teachers and 65 adaptor awLii'ds 
were given to 138 teachers. Some of the 
awards went to individual teachers, while 
others were given to teams of teachers. 

Disseminator awards enable public 
school elementary and secondary teach- 
ers to share their successful programs 
with colleagues through annual catalogs, 
workshops, conferences, and interschool 
visits. Adaptor awards support other 
teachers who want to use these programs 
in their classrooms. 

For more information on IMPACT II. 
contact Martha Taylor at (708) 907-5100. 




Siciind gnulers from Hull Sclnml in An. 
Iciini about Illinois nnnnnials from cm n 
\\inni}ig IMPACT II program tlcvclopa, 
llii'ir teacher. Lenorc Nicr 



IMSA Invites Students to Summer 'AD'Ventures; 
Adds Teacher Training Workshop 



This summer IMSA once again will 
welcome 180 Illinois students to 
its Summer AD'Veiitures iit Mathe- 
matics. Scietice and Techitology 
program. The first session, for 80 
students entering grades 7-8. will be held 
at IMSA July 7-16. The second, for 100 
students entering grades 9-10, will be 
held at Eastern Illinois University in 
Charleston July 6-18. Eastern, which 
first was used as a test site last year, is 
part of IMSA's ongoing study of the 
potential for off-campus programming. 

Summer also will be an "adventure"' 
for teachers and administrators as IMSA 
holds its first Sunuuer 'AD'Veutures 
Teacher's Workshop. The workshop will 
feature a five-day seminar and a fi\ e-day 
field experience. 

In the seminar. June 28-July 2, 
participants will study the design and 
development oi Summer 'AD'Veutures 



curiicukmi and learn how thinking logs 
can be used for instruction and assess- 
ment purposes. In the field experience, 
July 6-July 10. participants will observe 



Summer 'AD'Veutures in action and 
practice an instructional task assignment 
which thc\ designed durins: the seminar. 



IMSA Invites 8th Sophomore Class 

A total of 230 students from throughout Illinois ha\ e been invited to enroll this 
fall as members of the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy's (IMSA) 
eighth sophomore class. Chosen from a total of 714 applicants from 399 schools. 
the invited Class of 1996 represents 170 schools and 132 communities throughout 
the state. 

Students offered admission include 1 10 girls and 120 boys. The ethnic distribu- 
tion of the invited class is Hispanic 7%, black 1 3%, Asian 26% and white 54'^. 
This reflects continued progress in recrnidng and admitting a greater number of 
underrepresented minorities. 

The average SAT mathematics and verbal scores for the invited class are 635 
and 535 respectively. This compares to the national average for college-bound 
seniors of 476 and 423. 



IMSA FUND FOR 
ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President 

James R. Thompson 
Chairman 
Winston & Strawn 

Executive Vice President 

Donald E. Nordlund 

Retired Cliairman and Chief Executive Offic, 

Staley Continenta], Inc. 

Vice President 

D. Chet McKee 

President and Cliief Executive Officer 

Copley Memorial Hospital 



Secretary/Tri 

PaulJ. O'HoUaren 
Director General 
Moose International 



Linda Anderson 
Civic Leader 

Roger E. Anderson 
Retired Chairman and 

Chief ExecMive Office 
Continental Bank of 



Chicago 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball Company 

Marjorie Craig Benton 

President 

Chapin Hall Center for 

Children 
University of Chicago 

Michael J. Birck 
President 
Tellabs, Inc. 

Richard H. Brown 
President 
Illinois Bell 

Willard Bunn 111 
Chairman and Cliief 

Executive Officer 
Banc One Illinois 

Corporation 

Dr. Floyd English 
President and Chief 
Executive Offiicer 
Andrew Corporation 

Clifford L. Greenwalt 
President and Chief 

Executive Officer 
Central Illinois Public 

Service Company 

Susan S. Horwitz 
President and Chief 
Executive Officer 
Aurora National Bank 

Leon Jackson 

President 

Multi-Fac Coiporation 



Director of Institutional .Advancement 

Ted Parizc 



John E. Jones 
President. Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer 
CBI Industries 

Dr. Leon M. Ledemian. 

Nobel Laureate 
Director Emeritus 
Fermi National 

Accelerator Laboratory 

Steven H. Lesnik 
Chairman atid Chief 

Executive Offiicer 
Lesnik and Company 

Gordon R. Lohman 
President and Chief 
Executive Officer 
Amsted Industries, Inc. 

Ronald L. Nico! 
Vice President 
The Boston Consulting 
Group 

lames D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

James T. Schaefer 
Real Estate Consultant 



Hany C. Stonecipher 
President and Chief 
Executive Officer 
Sundstrand Corporation 

Richard Wellek 
President and Chief 
Executive Officer 
Varlen Corporation 

William J. White 
President. Chairman and 
Chief E.xecutive Offiicer 
Bell & Howell Company 



Hundreds Attend Special Events 

(See photos on page 5) 



Friends and supporters of the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy 
enjoyed several special events this spring. 
Examples included: 

• On April 20. IMSA welcomed donors 
and members of the local business and 
civic community to the dedication of 
the Grainger Inventors" Workshop. 
The workshop, funded by a grant of 
$325,000 from The Grainger 
Foundation of Skokie. provides an area 
for students to "tinker" and build equip- 
ment needed for their research. 

• On May 3. IMSA hosted a State-of-the- 
Academy reception in Springfield for 
Illinois legislators, legislative staff 
members and other government offi- 
cials. The reception, supported by the 
IMSA Fund, was held in the Illinois 
State Librarv Atrium. 



• On May 4. Dr. Richard Garwin. IBM 
Fellow at the Thomas J. Watson 
Research Center in New York, gave the 
second annual Richard L. Horwitz 
Lecture on Ethics for IMSA seniors, 
staff members and alumni, and friends 
and family of Rich Horwitz. The 
lecture series is held in memory of 
Auroran Rich Horwitz. IMSA's first 
legal counsel, who died in August 1990. 
Garwin is a consultant to the U.S. 
government on military and health care 
technologies, arms control, and science 
and public policy. 

• On May 14, Nobel Prize- winning physi- 
cist Dr. Leon Lederman held a book- 
signing for IMSA students, staff 
members, parents and alumni. He auto- 
graphed copies of his new book. The 
God Particle: If the Universe is the 
Answer. What is the Question'.' 



IMSA Fund Board Annual Meeting 




IMSA E.u'ctilive Director Dr Srepliciiuc Ptu e Mai sluill {a tilt i ) tlwiil<s retiriiti; IMSA Fund board 
iiienilwrs Linda and Roi;fr Ander.sim fot titeii } eai s of leadt i ship and serviced 




Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall. IMSA executive liircdcr, tercels 
Sen. Kenneth Hall (left) and attorney Vaii.qlin Barber at a recent IMSA 
eception for Illinois Iciiislators ami other i^ovcrnnicnt ofjiciaLs. 




Mathematics teacher Sii^an [uhlins Ji\iii\ses the accomplishinents of 
IMSA 's diverse student body with Illinois Iciiislalors. 








Dr Richard Garuni chats null IM.S.\ '.cnioryh'lhnvin:^ his /<■< /((, 
"Ethics in .Action lor Ethics Inaction). " 



Dr. Leon Lcdernuin siy.ns copies of Ins new hook for admiring 
IMSA fans. 



Grainger 
Inventors' 
Workshop 
Dedication 



|m 




Pholiiv by 

Cathv Veal 



Mentorship Students Dazzle University 
Researchers and Undergraduates 



I MSA's mentorship program has 
turned out to be a match made in 
heaven. ..the ideal mairiage between 
classroom learning and real-world 
research. For the second year in a row. 
students involved in IMSA's mentorship 
program were the only high school 
students in the country invited to partici- 
pate in the National Conference on 
Undergraduate Research, held March 
25-27 at the University of Utah. 

This year, 12 students presented their 
research at the conference (see right). 
These and 107 other students conducted 
their research in IMSA's mentorship 
program, an optional cocunicular acti\ i- 
ty. In this program, students work on site 
every sixth school day with scientists and 
scholars in coiporations. educational 
institutions and laboratories in the 
Chicagoland area. 

Mentorship coordinator Dr. Peggy 
Connolly said it is an honor for IMSA 
students to present their work alongside 
students from major research universi- 
ties. "It is very gratifying to see students 
recognized for their work by authorities 
in the research field," Connolly said. 
"What better way to top off the year than 
with a celebration before fellow students 
and researchers who value their dedica- 
tion, tenacity, curiosity and contributions 
to the field of research." 

The National Conference on 
Undergraduate Research brings together 
more than 1 .000 undergraduates and 
faculty advisors who are involved in 
scholarly and scientific research. 
Representatives from more than 200 
colleges and universities attended the 
conference. Students introduced their 
research in oral and poster presentations 
and artistic peiformances. 

The IMSA students' projects covered 
topics in ecology and evolution, physics, 
astronomy, computer technology, 
immunology and other fields. 

IMSA Mentorship Program Grows 

Over the past few years, the number of 
mentorship sites, students and mentors 
has increased significantly. When the 




Joseph Arias Rachel Bun 

We\t Biookhu Rovkford 



Beth Guerra 
Vernon Hills 



Apinya Lertratanakul 
Darien 




Otinar Pnnce\ ac Matt Pritchaid 

Chicago HunUcx 



Tanya Reddick 



Rebecca Reichert 
Cnstiil Lake 




Sophia Williams 
Cliicago 



Jim Young 
Bourhonnais 



program began in 1989-90. 28 students 
participated. This year. 1 19 students 
participated in 38 sites. 

Some of the new sites this school year 
included Aurora University. Central 
DuPage Rehabilitation Center. Tellabs. 
Chicago College of Pharmacy. Numerical 
Algorithms Group. Wyler's Children's 
Hospital and the Dial Coiporation. 

At several mentorship sites, research 
opportunities continue during the summer 
months. Loyola University, which pilot- 
ed the si.\-week summer mentorship in 
1 990. expanded its program to support 
six students this summer in various 
research positions. In addition. Southern 
Illinois University Medical School and 
Argonne Labs will support IMSA 
students in summer research positions. 

Students Reap Rewards of Research 

Sophia Williams, a senior from 
Chicago, participated in mentorship 



under the guidance of mentor Dr. Jeffrey 
Doering. biology department. Loyola 
University. Williams worked on genetic 
mapping studies of chromosome 21 in 
hopes of better understanding why Down 
Syndrome occurs. 

Williams said working on site with 
researchers differs from classroom 
learning because the effects are more 
far-reaching. 

"You feel like you have a responsibili- 
ty and that what you do effects other 
people and not just yourself." Williams 
said. "Your work has to be quality and 
your experiments can not be rushed." 

She also said that working with a 
mentor really makes her feel part of a 
team. "The mentor doesn't know what's 
going to happen or what kind of results 
should be produced." Williams said. 
"So in a sense you're both working 
through it together." 



T R A L B L A Z E R S 



State and National 
Leadership 

Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall, execu- 
tive director, was one of six international 
experts interviewed by The Wall Street 
Journal for a special section on "nurtur- 
ing high-tech genius." published May 24. 

Mathematics teacher Titu Andreescu 

has been appointed a staff member at the 
four-week training session of the United 
States Mathematical Olympiad. Training 
will be held at the United States Militan 
Academy at West Point. NY. June 8-July 6. 

Biology teacher Dr. Susan Styer co- 
presented a workshop entitled Can You 
Make Sense of This? for middle-school 
girls March 13 at Waubonsee 
Community College in Sugar Gro\e. IL. 

Mike Fraga, social science teacher. 
was a panelist on the Work-in-Progress 
Roundtahle On American Indian History 
at the annual conference of the 
Organization of American Historians 
April 15-16 in Anaheim. CA. 

John Thompson, biology teacher, 
presented Alternate Assessments in 
Science Instruction at a Burbank School 
District #111 professional development 
program April 27. 

Ph> sics teacher Dr. Mark Horrell 
presented Tropical ami High Latitude 
Climates and Vegetation Patterns of the 
Late Cretaceous: EMainples From a 
Globally Warmer Earth at a special 
session of the American Geophysical 
Union May 24-28 in Baltimore. Md. 

Latin teacher Rose Moore conducted 
several immersion classes for first-year 
high school Latin students at Globalfest 
"93 in Bloomington. IL. March 20. 
Globalfest is designed to expose students 
to various languages and the cultures of 
their countries. 



Rick Bryant, coordinator of the office 
of college counseling/career develop- 
ment, recently was elected to a three-year 
term on the board of directors of the 
National Consortium for Specialized 
Secondary Schools of Mathematics. 
Science and Technology. 

Mathematics teacher Charles 
Hamberg has been appointed to the 
COMAP (Consortium for Mathematics 
and Its Applications) Advisory Board. 
He will serve as the NCTM (National 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics) 
representative to the board which 
publishes many mathematics materials at 
the secondary and college level. 

Dr. Raymond Dagenais, coordinator 
for professional development, recently 
was installed as president of the Delta 
Epsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi. an 
honor society in education. 

Student and Staff 
Achievements 

Foi' the third year in a row. a team of 
15 IMSA students won the 1993 Illinois 
Science Olympiad state championship 
held April 3. 

Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall, execu- 
tixe director, received the VanMilier 
Distinguished Scholar Practitioner 
Award April 15 in Springfield. She is the 
first woman to receive the award named 
in honor of Dr. Perry Evander ( Van) 
Miller, a leading scholar in the field of 
school administration. 

A team of four IMSA students — Kurt 
Gimbel of Sparland. Ashley Morgan of 
Carpenters\ille. Ryan Pierce of Aurora 
and Russell Simmons of Barrington — is 
one of 16 national winners in the 1993 
SuperQuest supercomputing competition. 

English teachers Martha Regalis and 
Soon-Heng Lim both were awarded 
six-week summer fellowships from the 
National Endowmenl for the Hiunanities 
(NEH). 



IMSA students received the highest 
team score in the nation on the American 
High School Mathematics Exam. In addi- 
tion, eight students were among the 150 
nationally who qualified to take the USA 
Mathematical Olympiad (USAMOl: two 
of these — Chris Jeris of Naper\ ille and 
Stephen Wang of St. Charles — are 
among the final 24 nationwide chosen for 
summer training for the USAMO. 

On .April 24. a team of 27 students 
captured first place in the 1993 Illinois 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics 
(ICTM) State Math Contest. 

IMSA junior Jenny Deller of 

Carbondale was one of only 75 high 
school students nationwide to receive a 
1993 Younger Scholars award sponsored 
by the National Endowment for the 
Humanities. The award will support nine 
weeks of full-time research this summer 
at Southern Illinois Uni\ersity in 
Carbondale. 

IMSA junior Kristina Cook of Vernon 
Hills was awarded a Mazda National 
Scholarship to live as an exchange student 
in Japan for eight weeks this summer. 

Alumni Achievements 

Michael Peil, "90. Wake Forest 
University, was appointed to a one-year 
term as editor-in-chief of the Old Gold 
and Black, the WFU student newspaper. 
In addition, he received a research grant 
to study "Urban Societies in Transition" 
in Beijing. Moscow. Warsaw. Prague. 
Berlin. Amsterdam and London this 
summer. 

Amanda Kabak, '92. Boston 
University, w as selected to head a study 
to find the best medium in which to grind 
ceramics that will be used in space-based 
applications. Kabak is working under a 
grant awarded to BU's Precision 
Engineering Laboratcjry. 



IMSA Senior Crowned Miss Illinois American Coed 



By Sandra S. Park, 
Student Writer 

Senior Joy Peters of Decatur said it 
was so unlike her to compete in 
any type of beauty pageant. Then why do 
it? Her response: "I just decided to try it." 

As it turns out this was a good deci- 
sion, for on May 1 Peters was crowned 
Miss Illinois American Coed. 

"I would encourage anybody who was 
interested in this kind of opportunity to 
compete, it's an incredible feeling." 
Peters said. She won a $1000 scholarship 
and an ail-expense paid trip to Hawaii to 
compete this summer in the national 
pageant. Peters also won the Academic 
Achievement award. 

Miss American Coed is not an ordinary 
beauty pageant. Contestants are judged 
on their poise and modeling of evening 
gowns, while one half of their overall 
score is based on a personal interview 
and an application that includes an 
academic transcript. Peters was first 
runner-up in last year's pageant. 

Her interviewers asked a variety of 
questions, including three words that best 
describe her ("intelligent, athletic, out- 
going"), the most influential person in 
her life ("mv mother") and her coals if 



she were to win the crown. "I told 
them that I would like to speak out 
on issues like education." Peters 
said. "When I wear the crown, 
people take notice and listen to 
what I have to say." 

This year at IMSA. Peters 
was named Female Athlete 
of the Year for her outstand- 
ing contributions to the 
Softball, volleyball and 
basketball teams. She will 
continue to play Softball at 
the University of Kansas 
in Lawrence, where she 
has been accepted to the 
honors program. 

Although she character- 
izes herself as a self-assured 
woman, she notes. "The 
whole competition ga\ e me 
even more confidence in 
talking to other people. 
Communication and articu- 
lation are so important." 



Sdiuira S. Park, a senior 
from Wlieaton. is a work 
service student in the IMSA 
commitnicutions office. 




Joy Peters. Miss Illinois American Coed, sports a 
ir/;»i/)i.? smile for IMSA Trustee Dr. Leon Lederman. 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora, Illinois 60506-1000 



NONPROFIT ORG. 

BULK RATE 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA, IL 

PERMIT NO. 129 



Address Correction Requested 



Althoiiiih we strive for iicciinicy. if you see an error in your mailin!^ label 
please call the communicalicms office at (708) 907-5033. 



k 




ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



riEIMQA A Pioneering Educational Co. 



Volume 7 No. 4 • Suniiiicr 1993 



IMSA Student On USA Mathematical Olympiad Team 

Wins Silver Medal in international Competition 



It was the icing on the cake for the 
Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy's math team when this summer 
Stephen Wang of St. Charles was one of 
six students in the nation to make the 
USA Mathematical Olympiad team. 

As a result, Wang participated in the 
International Mathematical Olympiad in 
Istanbul. Turkey. July 13-24. The U.S. 
team competed against 7 1 other coun- 
tries, placing 7th overall with two gold, 
two silver and two bronze medals. Wang, 
v\ ho was the first IMSA student selected 
lor the USA IMO team and the only 
Illinois representative this year, received 
one of the silver medals. 

In addition to Wang, another IMSA 
siLident, Chris Jeris. was among the 24 
finalists nationwide chosen to train for 
the team this summer at the United States 
Military Academy in West Point, New 
York. In addition, IMSA math teacher 
Tilu Andreescu was appointed a staff 
member at the four-week training session 
and traveled with the U.S. team to Turkey. 

"It was a great experience to see such 
young students deal with advanced 
problems that even would challenge a 
professional mathematician." Andreescu 



SIDE 



Ameritech Senior Open 5 

Class of 1993 Commencement 3 

In Memoriam 8 

IMSA Fund 1992-93 Highlights 4 

IMSA Leadership Conference 6 

NevN Donors 5 

Trailblazers 7 




34. ULUSLARARASI MATEMATIK OLIMPiYATI 



ISTANBUL, 17.7.1993 



said. "They are all very talented so 1 
expected such results." 

This latest achievement capped the 
most remarkable year yet for IMSA 
"mathletes" in local, state and national 
competitions (see box on page 6). 

What made the 1992-93 school year so 
successful? Mathematics teacher Susan 
Eddins said much of the credit belongs 
with the home schools across the state 
that provide IMSA students with a strong 
math background. "In Stephen's case, 
St. Charles was very supportive and gave 
him a sound foundation. When he entered 
IMSA he already was at a high math 
level," Eddins said. 



Andreescu agreed, adding that in 
addition to background preparation, this 
year's mathletes demonstrated an luuisu- 
ally strong desire to do well. 

A third factor, according to Eddins, 
relates to IMSA teachers" experience 
coaching at the national and international 
levels. Andreescu. for example, is a 
fomier coach of the Romanian Math- 
ematical Olympiad team. "We've been 
very fortunate to hire people who have 
been especially geared toward coaching 
math contests at the higher level." Eddins 
said. "They have complimented the 
coaches we already have and brought 

(continued on poge 6) 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivaii Road 
Aurora, Illinois 60506-1000 
708/907-5000 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Lederman. Nobel Laureate 

Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Trustees 

John Baird 
Teacher of Physics 
Quincy High School 

G. Carl Ball 
Cliciirman of the Board 
George J. Ball, Incorporated 

Dr. Larry Braskamp 
Dean, College of Education 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 
President 
BRK Electronics 

Sherry R. Eagle 
Superintendent 
Aurora West School District #129 

Forest Etheredge 
Retired State Senator 
Instructor, Aurora University 

Sheila Griffin 

Director of Business Assessment 

Motorola Incorporated 

Gary Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Robert Leininger 
State Superintendent 
State Board of Education 

John McEachem Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Dr. David Mintzer 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Physics and Astronomy 
Northwestern University 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdepartmental Manager 
Department of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Marvin Slrunk 

Retired President and Chief Executive Officer 

Madison Bank & Trust Company 

Dr. Richard Wagner 

Executive Director 

State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 

Principal 

Percy Julian Junior High School, Oak Park 

NOVA is published quarterly by the 
IMSA Communications Office. 

Editor 

Catherine C. Veal 

Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 



From the 

Executive 

Director 




Dear Members of the IMSA Community, 



/a\ s we complete our seventh year and begin our eighth. I would like to review 
^i^ some of the summer highlights at the Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy. 

We enjoyed hosting students in grades 7-10 from throughout Illinois for our Summer 
"AD' Ventures in Mathematics. Science and Technology program. For the second year, 
this program was held in two sites-at IMSA and at Eastern Illinois University. In 
addition to Summer 'AD'Ventures students, we enjoyed hosting students from 
Chicago, East St. Louis and Joliet, participants in our Challenge programs for talented 
minority students. 

In August, the Center for Problem-Based Learning sponsored the week-long Neison 
and Bette Hairis Institute on problem-based learning. We are deeply grateful for the 
support from The Harris Family Foundation which has enabled the Center to expand 
teacher training and research. 

Internally, as we welcome our new sophomores, the Class of 1996. we also are 
engaged in a search for a new principal. This summer, Mr. John Court, who served 
with great distinction as IMSA's principal from 1987-1993. accepted a new position at 
Glenbrook South High School. Mr. Court's leadership and service will be greatly 
missed by our community. While our search for a new principal is under way. we are 
delighted that Mr. Harold Burshtan. former principal of Wheaton North High School, 
has joined our staff as interim principal. 

This fall, members of the IMSA community will develop new action plans to address 
changes in the strategic plan proposed last spring by the strategic planning team. 
Most significantly, the new strategic plan strengthens IMSA's commitment to the 
transformation of teaching and learning in mathematics and science. We welcome the 
challenges that lie ahead and look forward to working in partnership with others 
throughout our state and nation who share the dream. 



Sincerely, 



> 



■-Tx^to 



y^yi^. 



Stephanie Pace Marshall, Ph.D. 
Executive Director 



Class of 1993 Celebrates Commencement 



Proud parents, relatives and friends 
packed Aurora's Paramount Arts 
Centre June 5 to see members of the 
Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy's (IMS A) largest graduating 
class receive their diplomas. 

Nobel Laureate and IMSA trustee Dr. 
Leon Lederman gave the commencement 
address to the 2 1 3-member Class of 
1993. Lederman. one of IMSA's founding 
fathers, spoke of his hopes for the future 
through his comments from the past, 
made during the ground-breaking cere- 
mony for the first IMSA residence hall 
in 1986. 

"If we do things right, they will be 
aware of what we really e.xpect of them: 
to be creative scientists-yes; to be superb 
engineers-of course: to be brilliant neuro- 
surgeons and research the origins of life 
and aging, to advance the technology of 
Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, to 
help our industries compete in an ever 
more challenging environment--all this. 



But we expect more— we want to cultivate 
an awareness of the social and political 
deeds required of them." Lederman said. 

In addition. Lederman advised gradu- 
ates to be selective when choosing their 
college courses. "Look for scientists who 
teach science in the light of the history of 
human thought. Look for humanities 
teachers who have the broader view-- 
who recognize that Faraday was at least 
as influential in human history as 
Wordsworth or Napoleon-but that we 
cannot come to grips with our heritage 
without having an appreciation of all the 
intellectual cunents that shape our 
world." he said. 

Reflecting on the past three years at 
IMSA. Executive Director Dr. Stephanie 
Pace Marshall noted some of the special 
opportunities the Class of 1993 enjoyed. 
"This senior class benefitted greatly from 



new and expanded resources and 
programs made possible by state and 
private sector support— resources such as 
the ProQuest computer system, the 
Toyota Video Production Laboratory, the 
Grainger Inventors" Workshop, the 
Strategies for Success Center, the Natural 
Helpers program, and yes. a new cafete- 
ria," she said. 

Student speakers Liv Gjcstvang of 
Rockford and Andrew Pitcher of 
Morrison credited IMSA for creating an 
environment that enabled them to learn 
from their fellow classmates. 

"At IMSA I learned to sit back and 
listen, not because I should but because 
I wanted to. and I was amazed by the 
voices of my peers: voices from all over 
Illinois: cultures from all over the world, 
of all colors and styles and beliefs." 
Gjestvang said. 

Pitcher added, "The cultural perspec- 
tives they (my classmates) brought to the 
(Continued on ptii^e S) 



IMSA finidiiiiti'.s Jasmuiv Huang 
of JoUct and Jennifer Soiiaito 
ofPalos Park. 




IMSA FUND FOR 




ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION 


BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


President 




James R. Thompson 




Chairmon 




Winston & Strawn 




Executive Vice President 


Donald E.Nordlund 




Relived Cluvmuui and Chief Executive Officer 


Slaiey Continental, Inc. 




Vice President 




D. Chet McKee 




President and Chief Exec 


itive Offiicer 


Copley Memorial Hospit 


1 


Secretary /Treasurer 




PaulJ. O'Hollaren 




Director General 




Moose International 




Directors 


Linda Anderson* 


Dr. Leon M, Ledemian. 


Civic Leader 


Nobel Laureate 




Director Emeritus 


Roger E. Anderson* 


Fermi National 


Retired Chairman and 


Accelerator Laboratory 


Chief Executive Offlcet 




Continental Bank of 


Steven H. Lesnik 


Chicago 


Chief Executive Officer 


G. Carl Ball 


Kemper Lesnik 


Chainnan of the Board 


Organization 


GeorgeJ. Ball, Inc. 


Gordon R. Lohman 


Marjorie Craig Benton 
President 


President and Chief 
Executive Offiwer 


Chapin Hall Center for 


Amsted Industries. Inc. 


Children 


Ronald L. Nicol 


University of Chicago 


Vice President 


Michael J. Birck 


The Boston Consulting 


President 


Group 


Tellabs. Inc. 


James D. Pearson 


Richard H. Brown 


President 


Vice Chairman 


Aurora Industries 


Ameritech Corporation 


James T. Schaefer 


Willard Bunn III 


Real Estate Consultant 


Chainnan and Chief 


Susan S. Schanlaber 


Executive Officer 
Banc One Illinois 


Chairman of the Board 




and President 


Corporation 


Aurora National Bank 


Dr. Floyd English 


Harry C. Stonecipher 


President and Chief 


Chainnan. President and 


Executive Officer 


Chief Executive Officer 


Andrew Corporation 


Sundstrand Corporation 


Clifford L. Greenwalt 


Richard Weliek 


President and Chief 


President and Chief 


Executive Officer 


Executive Offiicer 


Central Illinois Public 


Varlen Corporation 


Service Company 






William J. White 


Leon Jackson 


President. Chainiuvi and 


President 


Chief Executive Offiicer 


Mulli-Fac Corporation 


Bell & Howeti Company 


John E. Jones 




Chairman of the Board. 




President ami Chief 




Executive Officer 




CBI Industries 




Director of Institutional .Advancement | 


Ted Parge 




*Honorary Members 





IMSA Fund Tops $5 Million; 
Exceeds $1 Million in 1992-93 



^ ~ he Illinois Mathematics and 
L, Science Academy Fund for 
Advancement of Education raised a 
record $1,365,762 from the private sector 
in 1992-93, a 41% increase over last 
year's total. This included the Academy's 
largest private sector grant to date, 
$750,000 for the Center for Problem- 
Based Learning from The Harris Family 
Foundation of Northbrook. 

The record fundraising year pushed the 
Fund over the S5 million mark for its 
history. 

Among other Fund-related highlights 
in 1992-93, Ted Parge, director of institu- 
tional advancement, cited the following: 

• Public lectures given by world- 
renowned physicist Dr. Edward 
Teller attended by some 1000 
Illinoisians. 

• Dedication of the Grainger Inventors' 
Workshop attended by donors and 
members of the local business and 
civic community. 

• State-of-the-Academy reception held 
in Springfield for Illinois legislators. 



legislative staff members and other 
govemment officials. 

' Mini-grants totaling 57,000 for IMSA 
employees to implement their 
creative ideas that support IMSA's 
mission. 

' Contributions ($8,000) from five 
Illinois corporations to fund IMPACT 
II teaching grants for educators in 
their service areas. 

' Pre-curtain reception and benefit 
performance of Miss Saiiion attended 
by 400 guests. 

' $75,000 grant from the Caterpillar 
Foundation to support unique profes- 
sional development opportunities for 
IMSA teachers 

' $60,000 in computer software from 
Novell, Inc., to upgrade IMSA 
networks 

' $25,000 in fiber optic cable from 
Illinois Bell to increase IMSA's 
capacity to broadcast classes and 
special lectures 




Supported by The Horns Fmnily Fdiduliilion. the Center for Prohleii}-Biised Leaniiiii; .spon- 
sored a teacher tniiiiiiii; institute in Chictiifo this summer attended In' educalins from Illinois 
and other states. 



Ameritech Foundation Awards $30,000 to IMSA 

Golf Tournament Contribution to Enhance School Technology 



The Illinois Mathematics and 
Science Academy was one of 
three not-for-profit organizations named 
to share a $90,000 contribution awarded 
by the Ameritech Foundation in connec- 
tion with the 1993 Ameritech Senior 
Open golf tournament. 

The tournament, held the week of July 
12 at Stonebridge Country Club in 
Aurora, featured golfing legends Arnold 
Palmer and Chi Chi Rodriquez. In addi- 
tion. Chicago Bulls superstar Michael 
Jordan teamed up with Palmer to pla\ in 
the pro-am event. 

IMSA. the Chicago Child Care Sociei> 
and the Jane Addams Hull House 
Association each received S30.000 from 
the Ameritech Foundation, which has 
made contributions during the golf tour- 
nament for the past five years. 

"Ameritech shares with these 
groups a commitment to make the 
Chicago area a better place by strength- 
ening families and educating the 
young." said Richard H. Brown, presi- 
dent of the Ameritech Foundation and 
board member of the IMSA Fund for 
Advancement of Education. 

"We are focusing our philanthropic 
support entirely in the Chicago area so 
we can make a more profound and 
dramatic impact on the quality of life in 
the community." he said. 

Ted Parge. IMSA director of institu- 
tional advancement, thanked Ameritech 
for recosnizins IMSA as a leader in 




Bti.skcrhtill Mipeiskir Michael JurUiii ,lrc\v iraml cmwiLs in the IW3 Anicihcch Senior Open 
pni-am event. IMSA was one oj tliree Clneai;(i area iiri:ani:inii)ns to benefit from tliis year's 
tonrnanient. 



piloting the use of telecommunications 
technology. 

"Our goal is to use telecommunications 
technology as a tool to transform teach- 
ing and learning in mathematics and 
science." Parge said. "By using this tech- 
nology. IMSA's academic and external 
programs could reach more students and 



teachers across the state, thereby making 
a greater impact on mathematics and 
science education." 

Ameritech. founding sponsor and orga- 
nizer of the Senior PGA Tour event, this 
year increased the first-place prize from 
$75,000 to $90,000. thereby increasing 
its charitable contribution. 



IMSA Fund 

Welcomes 

New Donors 



The IMSA Fund welcomes the following first-time coiporate and foundation donors 
of $500 or more (February 15-Jul\ 30. 1993) to the Council for Educational 
Distinction in Illinois: 



' Ameritech Corporation 
' Computer Associates International. Inc 
' Consolidated Communications. Inc. 
' Helene Curtis Industries. Inc. 



' Lachman Technology 

' RJR Nabisco Foundation 

' The NutraSweet Company 
Charitable Trust 



Olympiad Team 

{vontunwd fiom page 1) 

additional strength at the higher level." 

The winning combination of home 
school preparation, student desire and 
talent, and IMSA faculty support paid 
off in big ways in 1992-93. Led by 
Wang, Jeris and Patrick Keenan of 
McHenry. IMSA had the highest team 
score in the nation on the American High 
School Math Exam. 

Although competitions are not the 
primary focus of IMSA's math program, 
Eddins said they are good opportunities 
for growth. "There is a lot of learning 
that goes on in an interesting and fun 
way during competitions," Eddins said. 
"We have students who are the strong 
leaders but also have students who are 
very supportive of one another during 
competitions." 

Andreescu believes the future is 
bright. He said he hopes Wang and Jeris 
will use their firsthand experience to 
help coach IMSA students for interna- 
tional competition next year. He predicts 
they will do as well or better, but says 
they need to work on a few areas first. 

"We need to work on our geometry," 
he said. "The Eastern Europeans and 
Chinese excel in this area and we do not 
stress it as much in the United States." 




270 Educators 

Attend IMSA 

Leadership 

Conference 



Organizational change, personnel 
motivation, integrative teaching 
and learning, quality review and parent- 
ing were just some of the topics explored 
by 270 Illinois educators during IMSA's 
1993 Leadership Conference June 23-24 
in Naperville. 

Teachers, principals, superintendents, 
board members, parents and other partici- 
pants in the IMSA/Motorola University 
District Learning Leadership Team 
(DLLT) initiative came from all areas of 
Illinois to attend the conference entitled 
"Expanding Capacity for Continuous 
Improvement." 

The DLLT initiative seeks to improve 
mathematics, science and technology 
education through a systemwide restruc- 
turing and change process. 

During the conference, topics were 



presented in many different formats 
including group workshops, concurrent 
sessions, issue sessions and team 
sessions. In addition, four general 
sessions were held by prominent educa- 
tors from throughout the country. Other 
speakers during the conference included 
educators from various Illinois school 
districts and representatives from 
Motorola and the American Association 
of School Administrators. 

Following the conference, participants 
were asked to evaluate the sessions and 
speakers. In addition, they were asked to 
provide recommendations on how to 
improve future conferences. 

As a follow-up to the conference, a 
proceedings document will be mailed to 
all participating district teams. 



T R A I L B L A 2 E R S 



State and National 
Leadership 

Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall, execu- 
tive director, traveled to Russia July 12- 
25 to investigate possible collaborations 
among the Association for Supervision 
and Curriculum Development. Russian 
educators and IMSA. In addition, a 
possible partnership between IMSA and 
a similar residential school for mathemat- 
ics and science in Novosibirsk. Siberia, 
was explored. 

In August, the Center for Problem- 
Based Learning. IMSA. sponsored a five- 
day workshop at the Chicago Hilton and 
Towers Hotel. Approximately 80 educa- 
tors from across the country attended the 
summer workshop to learn how to design 
and implement problem-based learning 
activities for K-12 classrooms. 



Social science teaclie 

Bernard Hollister 

received the Oliver S. 

Foster Award from 

lite Illinois State 

Historical Society for 

outstanding contributions 

to the study and 

teachini; of 

state and 

local history 

in Illinois. 

He is con- \ 

gratiilaled 

by Carolyn 

Kelly, last 

year's 

recipient. 



Physics teacher Margaret Park gave 
a presentation entitled Biophysics an 
Aesthetic Experience: Breaking 
Conventional Discipline Boundaries in 
the Sciences at the 1993 International 
Faculty Development Conference June 
28- July 7 in Colorado. 

Dr. Christian Nokkentved. social 
science teacher, is serving on the World 
History Curriculum Development Project 
at the Uni\'ersity of Illinois - Chicago. 




Student and Staff 
Achievements 

Physics teacher Patrick LaMaster 

was one of ten teachers to receive the 
Illinois Science Teachers Association 
Award of Excellence in Secondary 
Science Teaching. He was selected by a 
committee of science teachers, professors 
and professionals based on his teaching 
achievements in 1993. 

A team of 15 students captured fifth 
place in the 1993 National Science 
Olympiad held May 21-22 in Pueblo. 
Colorado. One student received 2nd 
place in the nation in the qualitative anal- 
ysis category and another received 3rd 
place in the designer genes categoiy. 

The IMSA Titan Dance Squad 
received three trophies at the Universal 
Dance Association competition held 
August 3-6 at Augustana College. As a 
result, the team qualified for the national 
championships at SeaWorld in Orlando. 
Florida, in February. 

Joseph Arias of West Brooklyn was 
one of only 60 juniors nationwide chosen 
to attend a 1993 Telluride Association 
summer program at Cornell University. 

Alumni Achievements 

Jennifer Mawdsley. '90. University 
of Illinois, was awarded a summer intern- 
ship at the Solid State Technology Center 
in Pennsylvania through the Summer 
Research Program at AT & T Bell 
Laboratories. 

Sendhil Revuluri. '90. University of 
Chicago, was appointed a staff member 
at the training session of the United 
Slates Physics Olympics, held at the 
College of William and Mary. July 6-18. 

Laura Kozlevcar. '89. graduated from 
Purdue University and received a fellow- 
ship from the Howard Hughes Medical 
Institute to pursue graduate work in 
microbiology at the University of 
California-San Diego. She was one of 
only 25 students to receive the fellowship. 



CommenCeiTieilt (contiiuicil froin jnii;e 3) 

conversations we had were so different from my own. that they forced 
me to examine my own behefs. Learning from the great diversity of 
people here made me a better person, a much more complete person."" 
Following certification by Principal John D. Coim that members of 
the Class of 1993 had met graduation requirements, students received 
diplomas from IMSA Trustee Jack McEachern and commencement 
medallions from Dr. Marshall. 





^^^HJ^PTTj^^^^l 


This issue of NOVA 




HE '^^1 


is dedicated 






in loving memoiy of 




f-'/H 


DANIELLE J. MCTEE, 

IMSA Class of 1993 


iiiiiniT iiiTT 


July?, 1975-Aiigitst 10, 1993 






.^ 




/A/.V.\ '.luilciils ciijoy the Rachel E. Szech Meiiuinul I'liiyi^nniiul. 
Szech. wild died in 1992. was a member of IMSA 's Class of 
1993. The playground, fimded by her family and friends, was 
dedicated in the spring. 



r^lMSA 



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Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 



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